Your Place for La Mirada Real Estate

La Mirada

I have been a local La Mirada resident since 1972! I started working as a full-time Realtor in 1992 at the only Century 21 Westworld Realty in La Mirada. My office sells more La Mirada homes than any other local office. I live and work in the area. 

 

History of La Mirada

Andrew McNally, founder and president of Rand McNally Publishing Company, came to California in the 1880's. In 1888, he purchased almost 2,300 acres of range land, which was part of Rancho Los Coyotes, and named the area La Mirada, which in Spanish means "The View". He set aside 1,500 acres to be used for gentlemen's estates, hoping to attract friends from Chicago. On the remaining acreage, which he named Windermere Ranch, he built a home, a barn, a caretaker's home and had olive, orange and lemon groves planted throughout the area. He had a plant and a railroad station built, both on Stage Road, and shipped the finest olive oil and citrus fruit throughout the United States.

After residing here a few years, Andrew McNally turned the property over to his daughter Nannie and her husband, Edwin Neff. After a few years, their son Bill Neff and his wife, Mina, moved back to live in the home, which became known as Neff House and is listed on the National Register of Historic Sites. In the early 1950s, Neff sold all the surrounding acreage to a number of developers. By the end of 1955, over 8,000 new homes had been constructed.

Following three elections, two of which failed, the City of La Mirada was incorporated in March of 1960. By 1965, most of the unincorporated area surrounding the new City had been annexed. Today, with the completion of a new housing subdivision in the eastern portion of the community, the population is close to 50,000.

The City continues to offer many advantages to its residents: a variety of single-family housing, excellent parks including "Splash" a new water park being built in the Regional Park and recreational centers, a low crime rate, and quality senior housing. La Mirada places a strong emphasis on City beautification, with well maintained parkways, streets and parks. The La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts is one of the finest in Southern California, featuring plays, musicals and children's productions. City officials and residents alike are proud of La Mirada's reputation of being "Dedicated to Service".

La Mirada Remains One of the Safest Cities in Los Angeles County

April 17, 2007

Statistics released by the City of La Mirada indicate the community continues to enjoy one of the lowest crime rates in the region. 

Major crimes, which include homicide, rape, larceny, burglary, automobile theft, robbery, assault, and arson, dropped by three percent during the last 10 years, from 1,207 in 1997 to 1,168 in 2006.

Overall, the number of major crimes in La Mirada decreased by 16 percent from 1,389 in 2005 to 1,168 in 2006.

“This past year, the City worked proactively to address criminal activity in La Mirada,” says City Manager Andrea M. Travis.

Measures taken to enhance public safety and reduce criminal activity in the community included:

·     The City and Sheriff’s Department were proactive and met regularly to identify ways to improve the effectiveness of the Public Safety Team. 

·     Construction began on the Community Sheriff’s Station Expansion Project which should be completed in Sept. 2007.  This expansion is expected to increase communication amount the members of the Public Safety Team, reduce response times and enhance customer service.

·     La Mirada implemented a license plate recognition program.  Multiple cameras were mounted on one vehicle to automatically read license plates and scan them into a computer in the vehicle.  Those vehicles with outstanding warrants or citations, or reported as lost or stolen are now flagged for the Public Safety Team.  This vehicle is also equipped with the newest technology in light bars and mobile communication units.

·     A Community Services Deputy was assigned to local school campuses to help enforce juvenile related issues.

·     The Public Safety Team encouraged community participation in crime prevention efforts through Neighborhood Watch, Business Watch, and HAM Watch.

·     The Positive Alternatives Gang and Drug Education Program and Positive Alternatives and Recreation for Kids (P.A.R.K.) program was an area of focus.  The Public Safety Team strives to educate students on the dangers of participating in delinquent behaviors and promoted positive lifestyles.

“These crime prevention steps demonstrate La Mirada’s commitment to providing problem-solving policing through aggressive crime suppression efforts,” says City Manager Andrea M. Travis.  “During the next year, the City will continue to make Public Safety more responsive and plans to enhance the quality of service and effectiveness of enforcement and prosecution efforts,” added Travis.

For additional information contact the La Mirada Community Sheriff’s Station at (562) 902-2960.

CNN/Money Magazine - #34 out of a 100 cities as one of the best places to live with a population of 7500-50000.

Population: 48,600
Median home price (2006): $553,136
Average property taxes (2006): $2,891

Located 25 miles south of Hollywood, La Mirada is best known not for its film or television industry, but for its theater. Converted from an old movie house, the 30-year-old La Mirada Theatre is considered one of the best regional playhouses in the nation - and it's active in the community. The theater hosts a number of events and workshops throughout the year for kids and teens. And a new 18-acre swim park expected to open in La Mirada later this year. -B.N.
 

LA MIRADA - If you're looking for a great place to live, look no further than La Mirada.

Out of 100 American cities, the 7.9-square-mile sliver of heaven was rated as the 34th best place to live by CNN Money Magazine for 2007.

To choose the best cities, CNN Money Magazine examined population size, crime levels, test scores, income, cost of living, air quality, racial diversity and access to quality health care.

"There's a lot of activity and opportunity for people to use from seniors to children," said La Mirada Mayor Steve Jones. "And we have a low crime rate compared to other like cities."

To begin selecting America's top municipalities, CNN Money Magazine eliminated cities that were more than 95 percent white, had low test scores, and even cloudy weather.

Using OnBoard and U.S. Census data, the editors evaluated the percentage of La Mirada residents who have short commutes to work, a variety of cultural options and viable businesses.

As for leisure, CNN Money Magazine considered the proximity of museums, bars, restaurants and golf courses and noted the average dollars residents spent on vacation each year.

"It's safe, kept up, and there's a good core of community members who volunteer and really care," Jones said. "It's just a great place to raise kids."

Jones also attributes the success of La Mirada to Biola University.

"Having Biola in the middle of the city is really great. There's a lot of volunteer work that goes into the city and comes from the members of Biola," he said.

Aside from offering a variety of cultural venues and entertaining theater groups, La Mirada prides itself on its ample housing market.

"There are homes as low as $450,000 that may need a little work up to $1.5 million, so there's a wide variety," said La Mirada Realtor Warren Nass.

He said most La Mirada tract homes were built during the 1950s and 1960s and sell for about $550,000. The sales prices for homes range from $429,900 to $1,600,000.  

Nass moved to La Mirada in 1972 when he was 6 years old. He said most of his friends who left La Mirada after high school returned to raise children.

"It's not a huge city but it seems like every time you go to the store, you run into people you know," Nass said. "It's 45 minutes to the beach, an hour and half to the mountains and 30 minutes to downtown. That's what I like about it."

CNN Money Magazine interviewed residents of each city and assessed their natural surroundings.

"The appearance of the city has always been solid and efficient. The city has taken on big projects but is still stable financially," Jones said.

Currently under way in La Mirada Regional Park is an 18-acre aquatic center named "Splash!"

The center, located on the west side of the La Mirada Regional Park, is set to open in October and will feature a lazy river, slides and 50-meter pool and 25-yard pools, among other features.

On the Net

http://money.cnn.com/maga

zines/moneymag/bplive/2007/

http://www.cityoflamirada.org


 


For more information about La Mirada or the surrounding area, call Warren Nass today! (714) 606-0329

 

LA MIRADA - If you're looking for a great place to live, look no farther than La Mirada.

Out of 100 American cities, the 7.9-square-mile sliver of heaven was rated as the 34th best place to live by CNN Money Magazine for 2007.

To choose the best cities, CNN Money Magazine examined population size, crime levels, test scores, income, cost of living, air quality, racial diversity and access to quality health care.

"There's a lot of activity and opportunity for people to use from seniors to children," said La Mirada Mayor Steve Jones. "And we have a low crime rate compared to other like cities."

To begin selecting America's top municipalities, CNN Money Magazine eliminated cities that were more than 95 percent white, had low test scores, and even cloudy weather.

Using OnBoard and U.S. Census data, the editors evaluated the percentage of La Mirada residents who have short commutes to work, a variety of cultural options and viable businesses.

As for leisure, CNN Money Magazine considered the proximity of museums, bars, restaurants and golf courses and noted the average dollars residents spent on vacation each year.

"It's safe, kept up, and there's a good core of community members who volunteer and really care," Jones said. "It's just a great place to raise kids."

Jones also attributes the success of La Mirada to Biola University.

"Having Biola in the middle of the city is really great. There's a lot of volunteer work that goes into the city and comes from the members of Biola," he said.

Aside from offering a variety of cultural venues and entertaining theater groups, La Mirada prides itself on its ample housing market.

"There are homes as low as $450,000 that may need a little work and there's $1.5 million dollar homes, so there's a wide variety," said La Mirada Realtor Warren Nass.

He said most La Mirada tract homes were built during the 1950s and 1960s and sell for about $550,000. Homes range from $429,900 to $1,600,000.

Nass moved to La Mirada in 1972 when he was 6 years old. He said most of his friends who left La Mirada after high school returned to raise children.

"It's not a huge city but it seems like every time you go to the store, you run into people you know," Nass said. "It's 45 minutes to the beach, an hour and half to the mountains and 30 minutes to downtown. That's what I like about it."

CNN Money Magazine interviewed residents of each city and assessed their natural surroundings.

"The appearance of the city has always been solid and efficient. The city has taken on big projects but is still stable financially," Jones said.

Currently under way in La Mirada Regional Park is an 18-acre aquatic center named "Splash!"

The center behind the fire station is set to open in October and will feature a lazy "river", water slides and an pool where those interested in competing in the Olympics could train.

California Cities Helen Putnam Award for Excellence; La Mirada 's Helping Hands Program Enables Needy to Maintain Homes April 2008

The City of La Mirada won an Award for Excellence for this project in the Community Service and Economic Development category of the 2007 Helen Putnam Award for Excellence program. For more information about the award program, visit www.cacities.org/helenputnam .

The City of La Mirada's Helping Hands program brings the community together, promotes a healthy living environment and encourages service to others.

While responding to a growing number of code enforcement complaints about home and landscape maintenance violations, City of La Mirada officials noted many seniors, people with disabilities and less affluent residents were not able to fix these violations themselves. At the same time, La Mirada was developing a growing list of volunteers looking for opportunities to help in their community. A Helping Hands program emerged to match these needs and resources -- and much more.

La Mirada 's Helping Hands program was designed in 2002 to enable residents to continue living in their homes despite physi cal difficulties, impairment and financial instability. Residents who are elderly, low-income or have disabilities may call on these volunteers to assist them with housecleaning and yard work that they themselves are not able to do alone. Participants typically do not have family members they can depend on or funds to maintain their homes. Helping Hands does not charge for this assistance and the organization provides referrals to other social service agencies as needed.

The Community Pitches In

Each month, volunteers from schools, churches and families come together to spend a day serving the community through Helping Hands. The city provides necessary tools, housecleaning supplies and transportation to each resident's home.

The Helping Hands program also uses a retired contractor and skilled volunteers to give direction and advice to other volunteers in the field, and in turn the program incorporates volunteers' suggestions.

The number of residents seeking assistance from the Helping Hands program has grown substantially. To meet the demand, the city is working to develop stronger connections with volunteer groups; for example, coordinating with students from Biola University, youth from La Mirada High School's Key Club, Girls' League and Positive Alternatives Club as well as local churches, which regularly provide volunteers for the program. Exposing young people to volunteer opportunities better prepares them to become more active members of their community as adults.

La Mirada has also developed volunteer opportunities for local businesses. With consistent help in the form of labor and supplies from local businesses, such as building supply retailers and tree trimming companies, Helping Hands has helped residents with more extensive needs and increased its reach into the community.

Many residents call on Helping Hands for assistance with code enforcement-related issues. One resident was referred to the program because she was disabled and could not afford to fix the peeling paint on her house. Instead of the city fining her for not complying with city codes, the Helping Hands program worked with her and partnered with a building supply retailer to repair her house.

Creating a Community That Cares

When houses are brought into compliance with city code, the homeowners feel more safe and secure in their homes, the neighborhood is beautified and a source of concern is eliminated. By recognizing these problems as important issues and taking steps to solve them, La Mirada promotes a community environment where caring and responsiveness are the norm.

Helping Hands has also helped meet residents' social service needs by providing referrals to care services, home modification services and meal delivery programs. These referrals ensure that residents have access to information that they might not otherwise obtain while also helping them remain independent in their homes.

As the program has grown, its structure has also been developed and refined, including establishing eligibility requirements for assistance. If residents need assis tance due to income constraints, they must meet income criteria and show proof of income. Senior residents must show documentation that they are at least 55 years old to qualify for assistance.

Building a Track Record

Helping Hands has grown each year in La Mirada, a community where older adults account for nearly 25 percent of the total population and needs are increasing steadily. Since the program began, Helping Hands has sent more than 625 volunteers to 136 sites throughout La Mirada, providing nearly 1,900 hours of service. Helping Hands events are now held at least monthly and provide assistance to three to four homes per event.

In 2006, Helping Hands won the California Parks and Recreation Society's Award of Excellence for Recreation/Community Services under the Neighborhood/Community Life section. In 2007, the program won the Los Angeles County Public Service Recognition Week's Team Accomplishment Award. This type of recognition helps build interest in the program and attract more volunteers.

The City of La Mirada's Helping Hands program brings the community together, promotes a healthy living environment and encourages service to others.


 

Contact: Thomas Robinson, director of community services, City of La Mirada; phone: (562) 943-0131; e-mail: trobinson@cityoflamirada.org.

La Mirada is ideally situated on the border of Los Angeles and Orange Counties, only minutes from beaches, mountains, bike paths, art galleries and amusement parks. Its name means “The View,” and you are sure to see great views around every corner in this picturesque, thriving community. Real estate options consist of single-family homes, condominiums and townhouses as well as a small selection of land lots for custom building. Downtown Los Angeles is a half-hour's drive from town. Disneyland is 12 miles southeast and Knott's Berry Farm is only six miles away. Within an hour's drive are such popular beach cities as Long Beach, Newport Beach, Huntington Beach and Laguna Beach. The city is known for its terrific location that allows for easy commuting to a variety of different business centers, not the least of which are Los Angeles, Long Beach and Anaheim. The community is home to just under 50,000 residents, many of whom are college-educated and affluent. However, that is not to say that housing costs are higher than the norm for Los Angeles County. La Mirada is known as the home of two major area cultural institutions, the La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts and Biola University, a Christian college with a top-notch reputation. It also features a strong school district, a well-respected hospital and the La Mirada Golf Course.

10 September 1953, The Mountain Democrat, Placerville, CA
‘Affairs of State’ by Henry C. MacArthur *

La Mirada Beginnings

Sacramento (CNS) – Almost every year, the California State Fair manages to come up with something out of the ordinary run of exhibits. Last year, it was the exhibit of the Chrysler Corporation, which depicted latest developments in the filed of automotives. This year, it’s the delineation of California’s first completely planned city.

Starting from scratch, on a 2,300 acre farm in eastern Los Angeles county, Harold L. Shaw, president of the Shaw Construction Co. of Los Angeles, is building a community which when complete will consist of 8,000 single family home; 2,000 multiple-unit dwellings; 75 acres of industrial development; a commercial area of 130 acres with plenty of parking space; 12 schools; churches, recreational facilities and playgrounds.

The story of this new city, which will be geared to serve some 50,000 people, begins away back in 1893, when Andrew J. McNally, whose maps even then were famous, trekked to Los Angeles from Chicago, and purchased the 2,300 acres which he named La Mirada.

McNally hoped one day to build a city on the site himself, but business intervened, and he died before his ambition was realized. The idea was picked up by Shaw, who reportedly is sinking around $200,000,000 into the venture.

La Mirada, despite the fact that it is an extensive promotion and whatever is written about it conceivably might be termed free publicity, is nevertheless deserving of mention in ‘Affairs of State’ for two reasons.

First, it’s exhibit enhances the attractiveness of the State Fair this year and provides something out of the ordinary for the fair-goer who is apt to be come saturated with too many watermelons, peaches, pigs, cows and other farm products.

Second, the fact that California has grown up like Topsy, it just grew, is generally conceded and the planning done in late years by cities and counties has been planning around previously unplanned developments. La Mirada, planned from the beginning, is a striking example of what could have happened in this or any other state if our lusty pioneer forefathers had given consideration to the developments decades in the future.

Obviously, the forefathers could not foresee the automobile, gas, electricity, telephones, and the modern home developments which theoretically at least, give the mothers of California more time to raise future citizens. Modern developments have taken a long time to accomplish, and the end is not in sight.

Here in La Mirada however, is a city that draws on experience, invention and modern development, taking the best in household conveniences for its installations, planning wide streets to accommodate 1953 and future traffic, sufficient schools to educate its citizens of the future, churches, shopping center and industrial locations, along with rapid transportation to the larger centers of population.

A hundred years from now, La Mirada may be obsolete, but from a study of the state fair exhibit, it will do for the present.

With California’s steady growth in population, and the shifting of population centers westward, it would appear the future of La Mirada, as well as other new communities in the state, is reasonably assured. And it also appears that more and better planning is necessary in California to correct some of the omissions of the past.

Areas of La Mirada

Green Hills - Located West of Beach Blvd, South of Imperial Hwy and East of Santa Gertrudes Avenue

Lemon Hills - Located near old Creek Park, North of Imperial Hwy, West of Santa Gertrudes Avenue and South of Leffingwell Road

Biola and Gardenhill - Located East of Valley View Ave, West of La Mirada Blvd, North of Rosecrans and South of Imperial Highway 

Hillsborough - Newer Homes and Condos located West of Beach Blvd, East of Santa Gertrudes, North of Rosecrans Ave and South of Imperial Hwy

Landmark - Homes and Adult Condos located West of Beach Blvd, East of Santa Gertrudes, North of Rosecrans Ave and South of Imperial Hwy

 

 

 


Ok
www.warrennass.com uses cookies to ensure the best experience on this website. Learn More